Fashion design courses in toronto - London fashion week blog

Fashion design courses in toronto - London fashion week blog



Fashion Design Courses In Toronto





fashion design courses in toronto






    fashion design
  • The art dedicated to the creation of wearing apparel and lifestyle

  • Fashion design is the art of the application of design and [[aesthetics]or natural beauty] to clothing and accessories. Fashion design is influenced by cultural and social attitudes, and has varied over time and place.

  • (Fashion Designing) Is a profession for all those people who like to take the above defined seriously.Requires drive and unrelenting passion to understand the nuances of science,art and mathematics put together to make and stylize clothes.





    courses
  • The route or direction followed by a ship, aircraft, road, or river

  • (course) naturally: as might be expected; "naturally, the lawyer sent us a huge bill"

  • The way in which something progresses or develops

  • (course) education imparted in a series of lessons or meetings; "he took a course in basket weaving"; "flirting is not unknown in college classes"

  • (course) move swiftly through or over; "ships coursing the Atlantic"

  • A procedure adopted to deal with a situation





    toronto
  • Toronto is a town within the city of Lake Macquarie in New South Wales, Australia, approximately from Newcastle's central business district and is a commercial hub for the sprawling suburbs on the western shore of the lake.

  • Toronto was a Canadian rock band active during the late 1970s and early 1980s. It was formed in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, by guitarist Brian Allen and American-born singer Holly Woods.

  • A city in Canada, capital of Ontario, on the northern shore of Lake Ontario; pop. 635,395

  • the provincial capital and largest city in Ontario (and the largest city in Canada)











Aflicktion: Letters to Cyberspace




Aflicktion: Letters to Cyberspace





The fireplace is casting a blanket of warmth through our cottage home but I still feel chilled. The small lake is as clear as a mirror today, leaves reflected in and floating on the surface burn with rich colours but I can’t really enjoy them today.

It was October 2002 and the cottage was on Bell Lake in the Gatineau Hills of Quebec. I had just spent three weeks in Iqaluit, Nunavut getting the academic year's courses underway. Within a few days of my return to the Ottawa area the youth suicide epidemic struck again. I wrote this letter to cyberspace but I really did not expect any response.

Yesterday my urban Inuit students in their course on Inuit art, spoke of death --- too many deaths, too many funerals and fresh graves in small communities where almost no one is left untouched. Another youth, Jimmy took his life last weekend in Iqaluit, Nunavut. The suicide rate in North America’s far north has no equal anywhere on our globe. We couldn't just talk about sculpture, prints and drawings. I strained to hear not just to listen . . . to force time to slow down. I was out of sync with the cadence of their voices. These are supposed to be the learners but I am learning from them. They were grappling with the loss of someone who was a real embodied presence throughout their youth and childhood. I needed them to help me understand. I speak too fast with too many words.

Seventeen hours later after trying to watch brain candy or tranquilize my mind with the hues and saturations of the lake leaves, I am still unable to settle in to my real world obligations. So I am writing letters to cyberspace addressing them to journalists. We are connected. NYT journalists do not simply produce our news stories, they construct our communal archives. The political philosophies that appear in the Times columns inform conversations internationally. Decisions made, policies enacted, interventions, transactions and agreements undertaken in New York, California, Washington, Kyoto, Rio Janeiro, The Hague, Tel Aviv, Baghdad, Beijing, Winnipeg, Ottawa and Toronto have as much --- if not more --- impact than conversations and consultations held in Nunavut. Assumptions and debates about the market, big or small government, direct democracy, policing, racial profiling, drugs, welfare, poverty, taxes that are covered in the pages of the New York Times impact far beyond the space on the grid of a New York mile and the time contained in a New York minute.

This is not Jimmy’s story. Inuit have tried hard to teach me that I cannot tell their stories. I can only tell my story through my eyes and my experience. Jimmy used to live in Iqaluit, Nunavut. He had a good construction job and his friends knew him as a young man who had a lot to live for.

Construction in Nunavut is booming. Entrepreneurs come north for several years or decades and legally amass fortunes as they rush ahead to improve southern Canada’s GNP by building, renting and leasing northern dwellings at prices several times the cost of a similar dwelling in the south. This is a boon to government workers and the upper middle class both Inuit and non-Inuit. According to the logic of the marketplace, this will eventually trickle down to the Inuit who are the most disadvantaged in the North in regards to underemployment, access to education, health and housing. But the youth are dying so quickly I don’t know how many will be there to benefit when help finally does arrive. In the midst of this construction boom many Inuit are still living in overcrowding conditions shockingly comparable to the Third World. Nunavut is a conflicted region of great promise after negotiating a more equitable relationship to the rest of Canada but it is also a region of ever-deepening despair. Extremes of wealth and poverty co-exist with intimacy that is too close for comfort.

Last week Jimmy was part of the boom. He was one of the fortunate Inuit who had found a job. The friends who introduced me to Jimmy through their memories of him, described a young man full of promise. The cadence of the conversations yesterday, like many kitchen table conversations with First Nations, Inuit and Metis friends resonates with the dialogue and silences that narrate the ‘long take’ vistas of a Zach Kunuk video. One of the students from the Igloolik area --- where Atanarjuat was filmed --- spent yesterday afternoon tracing intricate trails in red on a university photocopy of a 1-125,000 map of the islands, waterways and mainland that he knew intimately from his years of traveling with his grandfather. As he traced the pathways, he meticulously wrote the names of familiar places in red syllabics. From time to time he would explain the meaning of these coded words. Each place name described the physical space so accurately it was as though he succeeded in breaking the code that unlocked Borges’ ‘Art of Cartography.’ As he spoke, Julia whispered warnings about imposed flag post place names like Fury Strait. He created a vi











The Art of Medieval Warfare.




The Art of Medieval Warfare.





The Toronto Ontario Medieval Times castle is located in beautiful Exhibition Place. This is your chance to step back in time ... Medieval Times! Experience what it's like to be taken back in time to enjoy all the adventures and romance of the Middle Ages while enjoying a royal feast. In this modern world, a place still exists where knights battle for their kingdoms honor. Enjoy dinner and a show in the magnificent settings that is Medieval Times. Watch valiant knights compete in their centuries old Tournament of Games. You can expect to see a remarkable display of horsemanship, sword fights, jousting matches and more!
Customers pay for the dinner and show on a single ticket; after purchasing, they gather for pre-show entertainment outside the venue at a "castle". Each castle has a capacity of between 1,000 and 1,500 patrons. Upon admission, patrons are seated at tables encircling a large indoor arena, in which the performing knights engage in jousting as well as sword fighting and individual and equestrian skill games. The house is divided into six sections, each assigned a different color, and the audience members are encouraged to cheer for knights who wear the same color (an authentic nod to traditions of courtly love). Dinner is served in courses, without eating utensils, as the audience is to eat with their hands in "medieval fashion" (historically, knives and spoons were customary; forks and knives are available at the show for those who desire). There is no menu to choose from; a typical meal consists of soup, garlic bread, bone chicken, one potato, one rib, a varied pastry, and Pepsi, iced tea, beer and/or coffee. A vegetarian dish can be given to those who request it. It differs from a historically-accurate medieval kingly feast, with the potato, Pepsi, and coffee being especially anachronistic. Dinner and show are designed to last two hours









fashion design courses in toronto







See also:

fashion belts for men

upcoming fashion shows in india

high fashion plus size

10 fashion tips

fashion careers new york

punk fashion for men

jobs in fashion toronto

jobs in fashion melbourne

model male fashion

fashion tv hot images




[ 22:01] | Category: None
[tag] fashion design courses in toronto 2011 fall winter bed group
Trackbacks:(0) |

Vintage Fashion Print - Shenzhen Wholesale Fashion - Fashion Outlet Niagara Falls Canada.



Vintage Fashion Print





vintage fashion print






    vintage fashion
  • Vintage clothing is a generic term for new or second hand garments originating from a previous era. The phrase is also used in connection with a retail outlet, e.g. "vintage clothing store." It can also be used as an adjective: "This dress is vintage."





    print
  • The text appearing in a book, newspaper, or other printed publication, esp. with reference to its size, form, or style

  • A newspaper or magazine

  • the text appearing in a book, newspaper, or other printed publication; "I want to see it in print"

  • a picture or design printed from an engraving

  • The state of being available in published form

  • put into print; "The newspaper published the news of the royal couple's divorce"; "These news should not be printed"











Vintage Fashion Shot




Vintage Fashion Shot





I met Melike in Pittsburgh through my friend Jeff a Dancer at Attack Theater.

Dancers and fashion just work.
Try it.

This is a candid before Melike ran and jumped in front of the sun to show off the dress.

Technical: No Strobes Strobists. I metered the shadow side of Melike to get the contrasty light. In photoshop I mixed the channels as if I were sending my film out to be cross processed.

Simple. Fun. Love simple and fun.

Side note: I shot this at Ida Lee Park in Leesburg, Virginia. I photographed a rally for President Obama's campaign here. Turns out Melike's Mom was in the crowd. She was in front and shooting from the media raiser it was inevitable I found her Mom.












vintage fashion print







See also:

online fashion classes

songs for fashion shows

latest fashion for women

japanese fashion and style for men

fashion magazine jobs

ladies fashion shopping

free fashion books

fashion photography vintage

fashion valley mall san diego




[ 21:57] | Category: None
[tag] vintage fashion print emo dress up paris week fall winter
Trackbacks:(0) |

Comment is pending approval.
-


Comments:を閉じる▲